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The Destiny of Lesser Animals

With winter soon approaching, I would like to take this moment to remind people of our most important social responsibility… Thank you for remembering the less fortunate.

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo, M.Ed., Ph.D.

Homeless in the winter

Homeless in America

“Get a job, is the comment most often hurled at homeless individuals as they panhandle their way through the streets of our cities. Some are addicts, some are mentally impaired, some are just temporarily down on their luck, some are veterans, and many are targeted. By far the most painful to see are the veterans some with missing limbs. So, the next time you see a homeless person and you start thinking, get a job, just stop and count your blessings that you have a roof over your head because it is only by the grace of god that you are not homeless.” National Homeless Organization (2009).

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Addiction Professionals Are Amazing!

National Addiction Professional Day

A Monthly Shot for Opioid Addiction: An Option For Some

On average, 44 people in the United States die every day from an overdose of opioid prescription painkillers. These drugs — such as Vicodin, Percocet, codeine, and morphine — reduce the brain’s recognition of pain by binding to certain receptors in the body. With continued use, a person can develop a physical dependence on these drugs, such that withdrawal symptoms occur if the drug is stopped. These drugs can also cause a “high.” Both of these effects contribute to addiction — that is, the loss of control around the use of a drug, even though it causes harm to the person. Addiction to opioid painkillers is the biggest risk factor for heroin addiction.

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“BUYER BEWARE” When It comes to Addiction Treatment

APR 25, 2018 / BY ALEXANDRA PLANTE, MA / NO COMMENTS

Substance use disorders affect millions of Americans, and overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. The need for treatment and recovery services has never been greater. This increasing demand has led to rapid growth in the number of detox and treatment service providers, which has burgeoned into a $35 billion a year industry. Most of these service providers work hard to provide honest, quality care to save lives.
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Working on Addiction in the Workplace

When unaddressed, alcohol and other drug use disorders in the workplace are costly and dangerous for organizations, as well as individuals. There are many good examples of successful programs and resources available that can help, and with over 22 million Americans currently in recovery from alcohol and other drug use disorders, creating a drug-free workplace is entirely possible.
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Fentanyl: The Dangers Of This Potent “Man-Made” Opioid

As we watch the devastation of the opioid crisis escalate in a rising tide of deaths, a lesser known substance is frequently mentioned: fentanyl. Fentanyl’s relative obscurity was shattered with the well-publicized overdose death of pop star Prince. Previously used only as a pharmaceutical painkiller for crippling pain at the end of life or for surgical procedures, fentanyl is now making headlines as the drug responsible for a growing proportion of overdose deaths.

So what is fentanyl and why is it so dangerous?

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, meaning it is made in a laboratory but acts on the same receptors in the brain that painkillers, like oxycodone or morphine, and heroin, do. Fentanyl, however, is far more powerful. It’s 50-100 times stronger than heroin or morphine, meaning even a small dosage can be deadly.
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Is Addiction a “Brain Disease?”

There are many good reasons to emphasize the biological underpinnings of substance use disorders. Perhaps most important, the biologic basis of this chronic disease is a strong argument for parity: that is, treating (and funding treatment for) addiction on par with other “biologic” diseases.

The stigma and shame of addiction has much to do with the perception that people with substance use disorders are weak, immoral, or simply out for a good time at society’s expense. Understanding that addiction impairs the brain in many important ways may reduce such stigma. What’s more, the specific type of brain dysfunction may help identify a range of effective interventions and preventions. For example, during adolescence, the brain is at its most plastic — and vulnerable. This is a time when caution and intervention may prove most valuable. The earlier the drug exposure or trauma to the brain, the greater the damage.
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BINGE DRINKING CONTINUES TO RISE — PARTICULARLY AMONG WOMEN AND SENIORS

Women usually welcome news that the gender gap in pay or leadership positions is closing. But lately we’ve been learning that women are also gaining parity in another respect: alcohol consumption. A new study from researchers at the National Institutes of Health indicates that the rate of drinking in general, and binge drinking in particular, is rising faster among women ages 60 or older than among their male contemporaries.

When the researchers analyzed data from National Health Interview Surveys from 1997 through 2014, they found that the proportion of older women drinkers increased at a rate of 1.6% a year, compared with 0.7% for older men. Binge drinking (defined as imbibing four or more drinks within two hours) increased by 3.7% annually among older women, but held steady among older men. The results were reported online March 24, 2017, by Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Breaking Free From Addiction

COVER STORYBreaking free from addiction

By one of the later relapses, Sheff, a journalist, had already begun researching a book about addiction and had interviewed some of the world’s leading experts on the biology of addiction and treatment.

“I was frantic,” he says. “I called the guy who knows more about meth than anyone in the world, and I asked him ‘Where can I send my son?’ And he had no idea. He was stunned. He asked colleagues, other researchers, and they didn’t know either.”

Sheff did find a treatment program for his son, but not through his scientist contacts — he found it through a friend, another father with an addicted child.
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5 MYTHS ABOUT USING SUBOXONE TO TREAT OPIATE ADDICTION

What is Suboxone and how does it work?

big-bottle-suboxone-addiction-treatment-1140x640Suboxone, a combination medication containing buprenorphine and naloxone, is one of the main medications used for medication-assisted therapy (MAT) for opiate addiction. Use of MATs has been shown to lower the risk of fatal overdoses by approximately 50%. Suboxone works by tightly binding to the same receptors in the brain as other opiates, such as heroin, morphine, and oxycodone. By doing so, it blunts intoxication with these other drugs, it prevents cravings, and it allows many people to transition back from a life of addiction to a life of relative normalcy and safety.

A key goal of many advocates is to make access to Suboxone much more widely available, so that people who are addicted to opiates can readily access it. Good places to start are in the emergency department and in the primary care doctor’s office. More doctors need to become “waivered” to prescribe this medication, which requires some training and a special license. The vast majority of physicians, addiction experts, and advocates agree: Suboxone saves lives.

Common myths about using Suboxone to treat addiction

Unfortunately, within the addiction community and among the public at large, certain myths about Suboxone persist, and these myths add a further barrier to treatment for people suffering from opiate addiction.

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INVOLUNTARY TREATMENT FOR SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER: A MISGUIDED RESPONSE TO THE OPIOID CRISIS

Recently, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker introduced “An Act Relative to Combatting Addiction, Accessing Treatment, Reducing Prescriptions, and Enhancing Prevention” (CARE Act) as part of a larger legislative package to tackle the state’s opioid crisis. The proposal would expand on the state’s existing involuntary commitment law, building on an already deeply-troubled system. Baker’s proposal is part of a misguided national trend to use involuntary commitment or other coercive treatment mechanisms to address the country’s opioid crisis.

The CARE Act and involuntary hold

Right now, Section 35 of Massachusetts General Law chapter 123 authorizes the state to involuntarily commit someone with an alcohol or substance use disorder for up to 90 days. The legal standards and procedures for commitment are broad; a police officer, physician, or family member of an individual whose substance use presents the “likelihood of serious harm” can petition the court.
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Self-Defeat

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo, M.Ed., Ph.D.

Understanding The Self-Defeating Personality

Self-defeating personalities display consistent patterns of detrimental behavior resulting in problematic situations and failed relationships.

self destruct

Artist Unknown, saved from Google Images

These personalities create disappointing environments, become stagnant, and fail to accomplish important life goals. These individuals lack self-esteem, self-awareness, and self-acceptance. They are riddled with guilt and shame, and according to the definition of personality disorder, do have maladaptive processing methods that create problematic patterns of relating, perceiving and behaving. Their behavior does create problems in their daily lives, in their personal relationships, (preferring to stay and suffer in a bad relationship, rather than move forward in a healthy one, or to be alone,) and their off-putting behavior does diminish their ability to function in society. Social interaction is a significant component of any healthy relationship and is imperative when trying to establish relationships at a deeper level. The self-defeating personality, the consummate victim will be a people pleaser, will attempt to be optimistic, will attempt to lovingly commit, and then will wholeheartedly invest in sabotage.  Their inability to love or even like themselves often leads to inappropriate choices and related conditions such as substance abuse, eating disorders, and gambling addictions, making any healthy relationship impossible.

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A Positive Perspective On Life

Social Interpersonal Growth
A Humanistic Approach to Positive Growth and Self-Acceptance
Creating Positive Psychological Change

 

“The science of psychology has been far more successful on the negative than on the positive side. It has revealed to us much about man’s shortcomings, his illness, his sins, but little about his potentialities, his virtues, his achievable aspirations, or his full psychological height. It is as if psychology has voluntarily restricted itself to only half its rightful jurisdiction, and that, the darker, meaner half” (Maslow, 1954, p. 354).

There are many ways that one can be deterred from achieving his or her personal goals.  Overcoming obstacles can be challenging and requires personal desire and commitment to succeed.  The basic tenets of Humanistic theory consist of theories by Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and Existentialist Rollo May whom suggest that inner freedom represents the power to choose and direct one’s life.  Humanistic theorists contend that finding self and the meaning of life through free will, choice, self-acceptance, and personal responsibility is the intrinsic motivation needed to achieve personal fulfillment.

The fundamental principles of humanistic psychology appeared in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology and can be summarized as follows:11659319_10153053027492615_2609109390021993561_n

  • A human being is more than just a sum of his or her parts. He or she should be viewed holistically, not reductively.
  • A person’s behavior is influenced by his or her environment. Social interactions are key in the development of a human being.
  • People are aware of their existence, that is, they are conscious of themselves and their surroundings. They are aware of past experiences and use them to inform present and future behavior.
  • Human beings have free will and make conscious choices. They are not driven by instinct or impulse alone.
  • Human beings have intentional goals and seek to create meaning in life.

Individuals attempting to escape self-destructive, self-defeating, and addictive behaviors require positive non-judgmental social interaction and support.   Without such support, it is extremely difficult to make the changes necessary to move forward and live a positive, healthy, and fulfilling life.  Social Interpersonal Growth is a Humanistic self-care therapeutic process that assists individuals in assessing their past to improve their future by becoming emotionally, intellectually, and socially secure in all aspects of life.

The objective of Social Interpersonal Growth is to help is to help individuals cope with emotional, gender specific, relationship, and social issues by learning change strategies, developing coping mechanisms, and the communication skills necessary to create positive change and eradicate addictive self-defeating behaviors. Using a Humanistic approach with an emphasis and focus on positive qualities one can reduce and overcome anxiety, self-defeating, and self-destructive addictive behaviors. One will strive for self-acceptance gaining better insight into themselves, their behaviors, and their environment. Social Interpersonal Growth focuses on the person’s positive qualities and enables the whole person to attain inner peace, create and maintain positive relationships, and live a healthy life style.

Dombeck (2009) reminds us that the key insights to take home from humanistic theory are that: 1) achieving happiness is often a matter of developing the freedom for yourself to pursue your deepest interests, and that 2) there are many ways that your deepest interests can get sabotaged or buried. You will need to overcome any road blocks (which frequently take the form of either fear or duty) before you become free. Techniques that tend to be helpful in getting you back on track tend to play towards your emotions (helping you reconnect with your buried desires and feel their motivating force).

To achieve positive results, it is imperative that one has a basic understanding of the issues that are most commonly addressed by humanistic therapies such as addictions, disorders, and mental illness to ensure that positive support systems are implemented and maintained.  The materials provided on this website offer information necessary to educate and promote the understanding necessary to engage meaningfully with how people think and feel about themselves; which is the first step toward acceptance and positive impact.

Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo,  M.Ed., Ph.D.


References:
Dombeck, M. (2009).  Humanistic Theory, http://www.centersite.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=9714&cn=353
Society for Humanistic Psychology-APA Div-32, http://www.apa.org/about/division/div32.aspx
The Journal of Humanistic Psychology, http://jhp.sagepub.com/


How to cite this article:
Nuzzolo, V. E., (2016). A Positive Perspective On Life. Retrieved from, https://risetoshinetoday.org/

Mind Over Matter

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Science writer Jo Marchant investigated the healing power of the mind for her new book, Cure.  Jutta Kuss/Getty Images.

 

How Meditation, Placebos And Virtual Reality Help Power ‘Mind Over Body’ Updated January 26, 20164:37 PM ET Published January 26, 20161:22 PM ET

Following our discussion on Mind Over Matter, Please review Dr. Marchant’s information. Listen to Dr. Marchant explain the process and please feel free to offer your insight and opinions regarding the topic.

Professor V.

 

Perfectly Imperfect

Self-Acceptance
By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo, Ph.D.,CADCperfect

The humanistic perspective of psychology is the work of Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow and focuses on the relationship of the individual to society (social), considers the ways in which people view themselves in relation to others (interpersonal), and considers how one see’s his or her place in the world (growth potential). (more…)

Propensity to Evil

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo,  Ph.D., CADC

good versus evilThe sixteenth century Puritan belief of original sin, the ideology that children are born evil and need to be civilized through harsh punishment and authoritative parental control,,

“Tabula Rasa” “blank slates,” Philosopher John Locke’s opposition to authoritarianism, the concept that human characteristics are attained through learning,,

Jean Jacques Rousseau, innate goodness, the rejection of Puritan belief, the rejection of Locke’s theories, the concept of inherent goodness. 

Innate goodness, the existence of evil, neither can be denied,, biblical concepts provide explanation for the existence of good and evil, but what secular concept can explain the existence of good and evil personalities. (more…)

Genetic Testing In Employment

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo, MBA, MAOP
On May 21, 2008, President George W. Bush signed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) into law. Congress enacted GINA because of the increased use of genetic testing. According to Congress as research progresses and new genetic information is presented these advances may result in the misuse of genetic information to discriminate in health insurance and employment, (GINA Section 2). (more…)

The Untouchables…

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo, MBA, MAOP

Many articles have been written about bad bosses, destructive personpsych narcissistalities, or the charismatic, narcissistic leader. But could it be that the real reason destructive personalities continue to thrive in leadership is because of conducive organizational cultures and the refusal to report bad leader behavior? (more…)

Really,, Your Genes Made You Do It?

By Veronica Emilia Nuzzolo,  M.Ed., Ph.D.drunk

Genetic influences are those inherent traits that specific genes are credited for.  Behavioral genetics is the study of genetics that attempts to determine the connection between genes and patterns of behaviors and the environment (i).

I find most interesting the topic of alcoholism.  Scientific/biological research has suggested that there are specific genes that determine if one would be more prone to addiction than others.  For this particular issue the discussion suggests that if you possess the “addictive” gene and are exposed to environments that promote the use of alcohol then it is more than likely that this person will become an alcoholic.  This environmental factor coupled with the genetic makeup of the individual appears to be a combination of genetics and environment, influences, and learning choices. (more…)

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